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CAT3508

New type of cloud

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Asperitas (formerly known as Undulatus asperatus) is a cloud formation first popularized and proposed as a type of cloud in 2009 by Gavin Pretor-Pinney of the Cloud Appreciation Society. Added to the International Cloud Atlas as a supplementary feature in March 2017, it is the first cloud formation added since cirrus intortus in 1951. The name translates approximately as "roughness".

The clouds are closely related to undulatus clouds. Although they appear dark and storm-like, they almost always dissipate without a storm forming. The ominous-looking clouds have been particularly common in the Plains states of the United States, often during the morning or midday hours following convective thunderstorm activity.

 

This was a question on a quiz show last night on TV, when non of the contestants knew what the word "Asperitas" was. I didn't know either, so I looked it up, and found the above answer

 

 

Neil 

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Thanks for the heads up Neil and also the links, some beautiful images can be found on those sites.

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Hi Brett,

No problem, I've always been fascinated by clouds. Just amazing how many types there really are, when you dig into the subject.

 

 

Cheers

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On 10/02/2018 at 03:53, CAT3508 said:

Hi Brett,

No problem, I've always been fascinated by clouds. Just amazing how many types there really are, when you dig into the subject.

 

 

Cheers

 

I am fascinated by clouds as well. They can be majestic and beautiful. Somewhere I hav an interesting book called Pilots Clouds. An interesting read if you can find it.

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When I was at sea we had to learn to read the skies at all times as it was always best to spot an incoming storm before it hit the ship.  I have photos of waterspouts in the bay of bengal, a cyclone in the malacca straits and went right through a hurricane in the Atlantic. One of the worst things though was a massive Haboob (sand storm) in the red sea. The stuff got everywhere and it took weeks before every last bit of sand had been cleared from the ship.  The sand shotblasted some parts of the ship and scoured windows and ports. It got into air intakes and even reached the engine room. It jammed one of the radar scanners caused damage all over place. The weight altered the stability of the ship for a while which was a tad worrying. Thankfully I only ever experienced that once in my career but that was more than enough!!

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